Surveillance
Self-Defense

Noticias

Twilio Demonstrates Why Courts Should Review Every National Security Letter

The list of companies who exercise their right to ask for judicial review when handed national security letter gag orders from the FBI is growing. Last week, the communications platform Twilio posted two NSLs after the FBI backed down from its gag orders. As Twilio’s accompanying blog post documents, the FBI simply couldn’t or didn’t want to justify its nondisclosure requirements in court.

Keep Border Spy Tech Out of Dreamer Protection Bills

If Congress votes this month on legislation to protect Dreamers from deportation, any bill it considers should not include invasive surveillance technologies like biometric screening, social media snooping, automatic license plate readers, and drones. Such high tech spying would unduly intrude on the privacy of immigrants and Americans who live near the border and travel abroad.

How Congress’s Extension of Section 702 May Expand the NSA’s Warrantless Surveillance Authority

Last month, Congress reauthorized Section 702, the controversial law the NSA uses to conduct some of its most invasive electronic surveillance. With Section 702 set to expire, Congress had a golden opportunity to fix the worst flaws in the NSA’s surveillance programs and protect Americans’ Fourth Amendment rights to privacy.

Code Review Isn't Evil. Security Through Obscurity Is.

On January 25th, Reuters reported that software companies like McAfee, SAP, and Symantec allow Russian authorities to review their source code, and that "this practice potentially jeopardizes the security of computer networks in at least a dozen federal agencies." The article goes on to explain what source code review looks like and which companies allow source code reviews, and reiterates that "allowing Russia to review the

ETICAS Releases First Ever Evaluations of Spanish Internet Companies' Privacy and Transparency Practices

It’s Spain's turn to take a closer look at the practices of their local Internet companies, and how they treat their customers’ personal data.

When Trading Track Records Means Less Privacy

Sharing your personal fitness goals—lowered heart rates, accurate calorie counts, jogging times, and GPS paths—sounds like a fun, competitive feature offered by today’s digital fitness trackers, but a recent report from The Washington Post highlights how this same feature might end up revealing not just where you are, where you’ve been,

It's Time to Make Student Privacy a Priority

Last month, the Federal Trade Commission and the U.S. Department of Education held a workshop in Washington, DC.

ICE Accesses a Massive Amount of License Plate Data. Will California Take Action?

The news that Immigrations & Customs Enforcement is using a massive database of license plate scans from a private company sent shockwaves through the civil liberties and immigrants’ rights community, who are already sounding the alarm about how mass surveillance will be used to fuel deportation efforts.

EFF's Fight to End Warrantless Device Searches at the Border: A Roundup of Our Advocacy

EFF has been working on multiple fronts to end a widespread violation of digital liberty—warrantless searches of travelers’ electronic devices at the border. Government policies allow border agents to search and confiscate our cell phones, tablets, and laptops at airports and border crossings for no reason, without explanation or any suspicion of wrongdoing. It’s as if our First and Fourth Amendment rights don’t exist at the border. This is wrong, which is why we’re working to challenge and end these unconstitutional practices.

Europe's GDPR Meets WHOIS Privacy: Which Way Forward?

Europe's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will come into effect in May 2018, and with it, a new set of tough penalties for companies that fail to adequately protect the personal data of European users.

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