House Fails to Protect Americans from Unconstitutional NSA Surveillance

UPDATE, January 12, 2018: The Senate could vote Tuesday on a disastrous NSA surveillance extension bill that violates the Fourth Amendment. Click the link at the bottom of the page to email your Senator today and tell them to oppose bill S. 139.

Groups Line Up For Meaningful NSA Surveillance Reform

Multiple nonprofit organizations and policy think tanks, and one company have recently joined ranks to limit broad NSA surveillance. Though our groups work for many causes— freedom of the press, shared software development, universal access to knowledge, equal justice for all—our voices are responding to the same

Supreme Court Won’t Hear Key Surveillance Case

The Supreme Court announced today that it will not review a lower court’s ruling in United States v. Mohamud, which upheld warrantless surveillance of an American citizen under Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. EFF had urged the Court to take up Mohamud because this surveillance violates core Fourth Amendment protections.

How to Assess a Vendor's Data Security

Perhaps you’re an office manager tasked with setting up a new email system for your nonprofit, or maybe you’re a legal secretary for a small firm and you’ve been asked to choose an app for scanning sensitive documents: you might be wondering how you can even begin to assess a tool as “safe enough to use.” This post will help you think about how to approach the problem and select the right vendor.

If the company can’t or won’t answer these questions, they are asking you to trust them based on very little evidence: this is not a good sign.

New CBP Border Device Search Policy Still Permits Unconstitutional Searches

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) issued a new policy on border searches of electronic devices that's full of loopholes and vague language and that continues to allow agents to violate travelers’ constitutional rights.

Tipping the Scales on HTTPS: 2017 in Review

The movement to encrypt the web reached milestone after milestone in 2017. The web is in the middle of a massive change from non-secure HTTP to the more secure, encrypted

Seven Times Journalists Were Censored: 2017 in Review

Social media platforms have developed into incredibly useful resources for professional and citizen journalists, and have allowed people to learn about and read stories that may never have been published in traditional media. Sharing on just one of a few large platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube may mean the difference between a story being read by a few hundred versus tens of thousands of people.

The Worst Law in Technology Strikes Again: 2017 in Review

The latest on the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act? It’s still terrible. And this year, the detrimental impacts of the notoriously vague and outdated criminal computer crime statute showed themselves loud and clear. The statute lies at the heart of the Equifax breach, which might have been averted if our laws didn’t criminalize security research. And it’s at the center of a court case pending in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, hiQ v.

Court Challenges to NSA Surveillance: 2017 in Review

One of the government’s most powerful surveillance tools is scheduled to sunset in less than three weeks, and, for months, EFF has fought multiple legislative attempts to either extend or expand the NSA’s spying powers—warning the public, Representatives, and Senators about circling bills that threaten Americans’ privacy. But the frenetic, deadline-pressure environment on Capitol Hill betrays the slow, years-long progress that EFF has made elsewhere: the courts.

2017 was a year for slow, procedural breakthroughs.


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