Surveillance
Self-Defense

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A Technical Deep Dive: Securing the Automation of ACME DNS Challenge Validation

Earlier this month, Let's Encrypt (the free, automated, open Certificate Authority EFF helped launch two years ago) passed a huge milestone: issuing over 50 million active certificates. And that number is just going to keep growing, because in a few weeks Let's

The False Teeth of Chrome's Ad Filter

Today Google launched a new version of its Chrome browser with what they call an "ad filter"—which means that it sometimes blocks ads but is not an "ad blocker." EFF welcomes the elimination of the worst ad formats. But Google's approach here is a band-aid response to the crisis of trust in advertising that leaves massive user privacy issues unaddressed. 

The Revolution and Slack

UPDATE (2/16/18): We have corrected this post to more accurately reflect the limits of Slack's

The CLOUD Act: A Dangerous Expansion of Police Snooping on Cross-Border Data

This week, Senators Hatch, Graham, Coons, and Whitehouse introduced a bill that diminishes the data privacy of people around the world.

Twilio Demonstrates Why Courts Should Review Every National Security Letter

The list of companies who exercise their right to ask for judicial review when handed national security letter gag orders from the FBI is growing. Last week, the communications platform Twilio posted two NSLs after the FBI backed down from its gag orders. As Twilio’s accompanying blog post documents, the FBI simply couldn’t or didn’t want to justify its nondisclosure requirements in court.

Keep Border Spy Tech Out of Dreamer Protection Bills

If Congress votes this month on legislation to protect Dreamers from deportation, any bill it considers should not include invasive surveillance technologies like biometric screening, social media snooping, automatic license plate readers, and drones. Such high tech spying would unduly intrude on the privacy of immigrants and Americans who live near the border and travel abroad.

How Congress’s Extension of Section 702 May Expand the NSA’s Warrantless Surveillance Authority

Last month, Congress reauthorized Section 702, the controversial law the NSA uses to conduct some of its most invasive electronic surveillance. With Section 702 set to expire, Congress had a golden opportunity to fix the worst flaws in the NSA’s surveillance programs and protect Americans’ Fourth Amendment rights to privacy.

Code Review Isn't Evil. Security Through Obscurity Is.

On January 25th, Reuters reported that software companies like McAfee, SAP, and Symantec allow Russian authorities to review their source code, and that "this practice potentially jeopardizes the security of computer networks in at least a dozen federal agencies." The article goes on to explain what source code review looks like and which companies allow source code reviews, and reiterates that "allowing Russia to review the

ETICAS Releases First Ever Evaluations of Spanish Internet Companies' Privacy and Transparency Practices

It’s Spain's turn to take a closer look at the practices of their local Internet companies, and how they treat their customers’ personal data.

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